Farmed and Dangerous Blog

Archive for June, 2011

Yet another case for closed containment: St. Mary’s Bay, Nova Scotia

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

Citizens gathered in Halifax last week to protest the Nova Scotia government’s approval of two huge new industrial-scale farms in St. Mary’s Bay, bringing with them foul-smelling bags of sludge collected from other salmon farms in the province. It’s come to this! Citizens hauling bags of sludge to the government’s door to try to get them to see – and smell – the unsustainability of net-cage salmon farms. (more…)

What is DFO doing to protect juvenile Fraser River sockeye salmon from sea lice infestations during this migration season?

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011

Sea lice on wild salmon

Many of the juvenile salmon now migrating through the Discovery Islands are the offspring of the Fraser River sockeye that collapsed in 2009. This subgroup of fish with a troubled past are faced with myriad hazards as they struggle for survival, but adding to their peril (and of course the peril of all wild juvenile salmon) are the rising lice levels on salmon farms. (more…)

Closed containment technology on a more responsible path for salmon aquaculture

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

AgriMarine floating tank salmon farm

Closed containment salmon farms require an energy input for the circulation of fresh water and dissolved oxygen as well the removal of waste. In the media, the salmon farming industry claims this energy use creates an “extensive” environmental footprint. However, what they leave out of the equation is that while net-cages use tidal power to perform circulation and waste removal functions (at no cost to the industry) this practice in the open ocean creates a significant environmental footprint.

In assessing the overall sustainability of net-cages vs. closed containment, we must consider all environmental impacts and their potential solutions in order to determine the most responsible technology for salmon aquaculture.

The main environmental concerns associated with open net-cage aquaculture are: sea lice and disease transfer to wild salmon; pesticides and antibiotics and their impact on ecosystem health; chemical pollution; escapes and invasive alien species; marine mammal deaths; waste build-up and contamination of the ocean floor; the use of wild fish for feed; and marine debris.

Closed containment technology reduces or eliminates most of the environmental impacts of net-cage farming, with energy use and feed impacts the remaining concerns. However, solutions are on the horizon to address these concerns as the technology continues to mature.

In a world working towards green energy solutions and sustainable industry, net-cage salmon farming is a dead-end technology. Independent scientists, concerned citizens, First Nations, fishermen, conservationists, wilderness tourism businesses and coastal communities that depend on healthy oceans agree – the weight of scientific evidence is clear and it’s time to get net-cage farmed salmon into closed containment.

Click here for more information on closed containment technology and energy consumption.